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BOOKS:
Jazz  Wizard Junior book 1
(middle school)
Jazz  Wizard Junior book 2
(upper middle/high school)
Jazz Fiddle Wizard
(College)

ORCHESTRA MUSIC:
Stringin' the Blues
(grade 3.5)
Swing on a String
(grade 3)
Swing There, Done That
(grade 2.5)

STRING QUARTET MUSIC: Jammin' Jazz Standards

Workshops:
Descriptions
Schedule
Feedback
Pictures
Handouts

Education:
Syllabus 1
Syllabus 2
Students
Arrangements

History:
Seifert Interview
Discography

Jazz Violin Radio:
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About

 

JAZZ FIDDLE WIZARD (College) - USER TIPS - Philosophy:

I wrote the original Jazz Fiddle Wizard a couple of years ago and have since then used it to teach many students how to improvise in the jazz tradition. During that time I have learned what points to stress and found a couple of alternate ways of going through the book.

Philosophy      How-to-use      remember    corrections

The bebop scales are a means to an end. The end is being able to improvise with chord notes on the beat.

Why do I stress the use of bebop scales?

Bebop scales are a means to an end. The end goal is to improvise with chord notes on the beat. If you play with chord notes on the beat you emphasize the underlying chord structure in your single line solo. This is what differentiates great jazz musicians from novices. Take any great jazz solo on a standard jazz tune and imagine hearing only the solo line without the accompaniment. You can still hear the form of the tune because the soloist play "on the chords". Playing "on the chords" means playing with chord notes on the beat! By the way compositions from Bach to fiddle tunes have chord notes on the beat.

Why all the theoretical bebop scale rules in lessons 2 and 3?

In order to teach your ear to hear chord notes on the beat you have to structure exercises that teach your ear the sound. That is what I've done in lessons 2 and 3. If you follow the bebop scale rules you will play with chord notes on the beat. In other words the rules makes it impossible to not play with chord notes on the beat.

Does it not sound boring to always play with chord notes on the beat?

It sure does. Playing with all chord notes on the beat means you play with the least amount of tension. As soon as you have taught your ear to hear chord notes on the beat as sounding "right", the book continues with techniques that add tension.

Why start with only dominant chords?

You have to start somewhere. The dominant V chord is one of the most widely used chords in jazz. Just remember when practicing the D7 bebop scale you are actually in the key of G major. See lessons 6, 14 & 15.

 

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Copyright 2004 Martin Norgaard. All Rights Reserved.