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BOOKS:
Jazz  Wizard Junior book 1
(middle school)
Jazz  Wizard Junior book 2
(upper middle/high school)
Jazz Fiddle Wizard
(College)

ORCHESTRA MUSIC:
Stringin' the Blues
(grade 3.5)
Swing on a String
(grade 3)
Swing There, Done That
(grade 2.5)

STRING QUARTET MUSIC: Jammin' Jazz Standards

Workshops:
Descriptions
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Education:
Syllabus 1
Syllabus 2
Students
Arrangements

History:
Seifert Interview
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Jazz Violin Radio:
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JAZZ FIDDLE WIZARD (College):

Sample Lessons:
Lesson 1: p1 p2
Lesson 13: p1 p2

 LESSON 13:
ARPEGGIO SHAPES

THEORY :

        Arpeggio shapes is a way of looking at arpeggios that makes it easier to incorporate upper extensions in improvised lines.

        Improvising using arpeggios is a completely different concept than using the bebop scale. The bebop scale was built on the assumption that the upper extensions of the chord, 9, 11 and 13, were non chord tones. In this lesson we will learn how to use the extensions when improvising using arpeggios.
        In lesson 12 exercise 4 we played the chords of the 2m & 5 in G from the root all the way up to the 13th. That means we actually played all the notes of the G major scale but structured so it sounded like a Am13 or G13. When playing arpeggios using the upper extensions we don’t want to be forced to outline the full chord. But, if we don’t play the full chord how do we make sure it still sounds like we are playing the right chords? The answer is, we use certain shapes similar to chord voicings that specifically outline the most interesting notes of the chord. This way we can outline a D13 without having to play all 13 notes.
        There are two basic ways of using arpeggio shapes. The CONSTANT SHAPES progressions uses the same configuration on each chord (see example 1). The CHANGING SHAPES progression changes chord configuration but uses as many common tones between chords as possible (see example 2).
        Example 3 lists a couple of other great sounding shapes on the Am7-D7-Gmaj7 progression. Notice that many of the shapes look like completely different chords. E.g. the first chord in example 3c looks like a Cmaj7 though it actually is a Am9 because of the bass note dictated by the chord symbol above.
        Arpeggios are enormously complex. Though this lesson by no means covers all possible ways of improvising using arpeggios it should get you going on the right track.

EXERCISES (CD track 9):

1.) Arpeggiate any of the shapes in examples 1 to 3. The sample uses example 3c. Play all the exercises to track 9 on the CD.

2.) Arpeggiate the shapes using more than one octave. Change direction when you please. The sample uses example 2 ascending on the Am7, then descending on the D7. Try this with another shape.

3.) Arpeggiate a shape but change directions and add skips.  The sample uses the shapes from example 3d.

4.) Use shapes from different examples and add bebop scales and rhythms.  The most effective way of using arpeggios is in combination with other approaches like rhythms or bebop scales. We will explore this further in lesson 14 and when we use arpeggios while improvising on tunes.

 

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Copyright © 2004 Martin Norgaard. All Rights Reserved.